Miracle Whip

[tubepress mode=”playlist” playlistValue=”UUi-h-thQ2WT-8gaTAjtlKUw” thumbHeight=”80″ thumbWidth=”120″ orderBy=”position” embeddedHeight=”340″ embeddedWidth=”550″ autoshowInfo=”false” showRelated=”false”]Miracle Whip

Fast Easy







 

In 1933 Kraft developed a new dressing similar to mayonnaise, but as a less expensive alternative. Premiering at the Century of Progress World’s Fair in Chicago in 1933, Miracle Whip was an instant success as a condiment on fruits, vegetables and salads.[1]

According to Kraft archivist Becky Haglund Tousey, Kraft developed the product in-house using a patented “emulsifying machine” (invented by Charles Chapman) to create a product blending mayonnaise product and less expensive salad dressing, sometimes called “boiled dressing.”[2] The mMiracle Whipachine (dubbed “Miracle Whip” by Chapman) ensured that the ingredients (including more than 20 different spices) could be thoroughly blended.[1]

However, another story claims that Miracle Whip was invented in Salem, Illinois, at Max Crosset’s Cafe, where it was called “Max Crossett’s X-tra Fine Salad Dressing”. Crosset sold it to Kraft Foods in 1931 for $300[3] (approximately $4,621.36 in 2013).[4] While admitting that Kraft did buy many salad dressings, Tousey disputes the claim that X-tra Fine was Miracle Whip.[1]

Since 1972 Miracle Whip is also sold as Miracel Whip (with the letters e and l swapped) in Germany.[5] It is produced formerly by Kraft Foods, nowadays by Mondelēz International in Bad Fallingbostel.

Ingredients[edit]

Current primary ingredients are water, soybean oil, vinegar, HFCS, sugar, modified corn starch, and dried eggs. The HFCS and corn starch are made from non genetically modified maize.[6] Ingredients making up less than 2% of product include salt, mustard flour, paprika, spice, natural flavor, potassium sorbate, enzyme modified egg yolk, and dried garlic.

Miracle Whip does not meet the minimum requirement of 65% vegetable oil to be labeled as mayonnaise as dictated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.[7]