Butcher Lamb

Butcher Lamb

Mutton Shashlik Recipe

 

Butcher Lamb

Fresh American Lamb 

Nutrient-dense
Lamb is a prime source of high-quality protein, vitamins, and minerals. As with other red meats, its protein is nutritionally complete, with all eight essential amino acids in the proper ratios. A 3-ounce serving of lamb provides 43 percent of an adult male’s recommended daily allowance (RDA) of protein. Lamb is high in B vitamins, zinc, and iron. Red meats, especially lamb and beef, are amongst the best sources of absorbable iron. For those watching their carbohydrate intake, lamb as zero carbs.

Lean and mean
Compared to other meats, lamb contains very little marbling (fat in the meat). Since lamb fat is on the edges of the meat, it is easily trimmed off, which means fewer calories, only 175 in an average 3-ounce serving or 7 percent of the average daily caloric intake recommended for a 23 to 50-year old male. Only about 36 percent of the fat in lamb is saturated fat. The rest is mono or polyunsaturated fat, the “good” fat in one’s diet.

 FDA definition of lean (3 oz)  Average value for cooked lamb (3 oz)
 < 10 g of total fat  8 g of total fat
 < 4.5 g saturated fat  3 g of saturated fat
 < 100 mg cholesterol  80 mg cholesterol
   Source: American Lamb Board

Good fat

      Lamb is one of the richest sources of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA possesses unique and potent antioxidant activity. It is produced naturally from linoleic acid by bacteria in the stomachs of herbivores (plant eaters), such as sheep, goats, and cows. CLA cannot be manufactured in the human body. The CLA content in milk and meat is affected by many factors: breed, age, diet, and management.

Lamb vs. mutton

      The meat from a young sheep (less than 12 months of age) is called lamb. It is naturally tender and mild in flavor. The meat from an older sheep (over one year of age) is called mutton. It has a more intense flavor than lamb, but is preferred to lamb in some cultures. Yearling mutton is the meat from a sheep that is between one and two years of age. It is intermediate in flavor intensity between lamb and mutton.

Flavor

      There is no flavor difference in the meat from a young intact male and the meat from wethers (castrated male lambs) and ewe lambs. As rams sexually mature, their hormones may cause a slight taint in the taste of the meat. Mature rams are more difficult to harvest than ewes and wethers. In some cultures, the meat from intact males is preferred to the meat from females and castrates. Sometimes, an unblemished lamb is required for slaughter.

The sacrificial lamb

      Since ancient times, lamb has been regarded as a religious symbol. Jesus is often referred to as the “Lamb of “God.” Sheep were commonly used for sacrifice. Lamb was served during the Last Supper. Lamb is traditionally eaten at Easter (especially Orthodox or Greek) and Passover.
      Muslims (followers of Islam) are probably the largest consumers of lamb in the World. Lamb is commonly consumed by Muslims during their major holidays. During Eid al-adha (the Festival of Sacrifice), it is common for Muslim families to sacrifice a lamb in commemoration of Abraham’s sacrifice of a lamb in place of his son. The meat is divided into thirds and shared with family, friends, and the poor. It is also customary for Muslims to sacrifice lambs to celebrate the birth of a child (two lambs for a boy child; one for a girl). The sacrifice is part of the “aqiqah” ceremony.

Per capita consumption

      In the U.S., per capita consumption of lamb (and mutton) is very low, less than one pound per person, compared to 57 pounds in New Zealand. However, many of today’s immigrants to the U.S. originate from regions of the world where lamb (and goat) are commonly consumed. Thus, the U.S. continues to import lamb to meet consumer demand. There is a growing demand for lamb in the U.S., especially among people of specific ethnic backgrounds.
 Country Per capita consumption (lbs)
 New Zealand
57
 Australia
30
 Saudi Arabia
27
 Ireland
20
 Bulgaria
15
 United States
0.8
   USDA, 2000

Teriyaki Goat Meat Skewer

Preparation Time: 1 hour

Cooking Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 kggoat meat deboned
  • 3/4 cupred wine
  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup chicken broth
  • 7 bamboo skewers
  • 1 Teaspoonsugar
  • 2 Tablespoonscorn flour
  • 1 Tablespooncold water

Preparation

  • Get rid of all the excess fat from the meat and tenderize it by pounding.
  • Cut the meat into large pieces.
  • Blend chicken stock, soy sauce and wine together for basting sauce.
  • Put aside ¼ cup of the sauce and marinate meat using the remaining sauce for 50 minutes.
  • Mix sugar with a ¼ cup of sauce put aside earlier to make teriyaki sauce and heat gently.
  • Add corn flour with cold water and stir into teriyaki and cook until thick.
  • Thread 3 pieces of meat onto each skewer and cook for 6 minutes on each side.

Marinated Lamb Chops

Preparation Time:

Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 3loin chops (lamb) fat trimmed
  • 1/4 cupmirin
  • 1/4 cuplight soy sauce
  • 1garlic clove
  • 1cmsginger finely grated
  • 1 tspbrown sugar
  • 1 tspblack pepper
  • 2 tspplain flour

 Preparation

  • Put lamb chops in a bowl and marinate.
  • Mix all ingredients
  • Add marinade to the chops and refrigerate for few hours
  • On a barbecue grill cook chops and bast the meat with extra marinade
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Barbecued Lamb Paillard With Eggplant and Yoghurt Sauce

Preparation Time: 10 minutes

Cooking Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Yoghurt
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 3 lamb eye of loin
  • Olive oil
  • 1 small eggplant cut into 1cm-thick slices
  • 2 tablespoons toasted pine nuts
  • 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/2 cup mint leaves
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Preparation

  • Horizontally slice each lamb fillet halfway to butterfly
  • Pound the lamb gently with meat mallet to an even thickness and cut into pieces
  • Add oil to the pan and heat over medium heat
  • Shallow-fry the eggplant for 6 minutes and transfer to a plate to drain
  • Season lamb with pepper and salt
  • Heat barbecue grill and cook lamb for 4 minutes.
  • In a bowl put parsley, mint, vinegar, pine nuts, and virgin olive oil and stir gently.
  • Serve the lamb on a plate and top with parsley salad and eggplant and sprinkle tahini dressing.

 

Barbecue beef, beetroot, and chickpea salad

Preparation Time: 5 minutes

Cooking Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 200g beef rump steak, fat trimmed
  • Olive oil spray
  • 200g canned chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 150g ready to eat baby beetroots, cut into wedges
  • 20g packet baby spinach and beetroot leaves
  • 60g goat cheese
  • Olive oil, to serve
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Chopped chives

Preparation

  • Oil the barbecue lightly and heat over medium-light
  • Season rump steak and cook for 8 minutes.
  • Put on a place and cover with foil.
  • On a bowl, mix baby spinach, beetroots, chickpeas and season.
  • Place the sliced steak on the salad and crumble over goat cheese.
  • To serve, sprinkle balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and chives.

 

 

Grilled chicken and corn wraps with sour lime cream

Preparation Time: 30minutes

Cooking Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 500g Chicken Thigh Fillets
  • 2 corn cobs, husks, and silks removed
  • 1/ cup (120g) sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons coriander, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 8 Coles White Soft Wraps
  • 1 baby lettuce, leaves separated
  • 250g cherry tomatoes halved

Preparation

  • Mix oil, garlic, and paprika in a bowl, season and add the chicken.
  • On a medium heat, barbecue grill.
  • For 15 minutes cook the chicken and keep turning till browned.
  • Cover with foil for 3 minutes for it to rest then slice.
  • Cook the corn cobs for 8 minute.
  • In a bowl, mix coriander, lime juice and sour crème and season.
  • Separate the kernels from the corn and place the wraps on a plate.
  • Add lettuce, corn, tomato, and chicken and top with sour cream mixture.
  • Enclose by rolling and serve.
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