Top 100 Hot Dog Manufacturers World Wide

Top 100 Hot Dog Manufacturers World Wide

 

 

 BBQSuperStars Topm 100

 

  1. Ball Park Franks
  2. Bar S Brand
  3. Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs
  4. Armour Eckrich Franks
  5. Oscar Mayer
  6. Vienna Brand Hot Dogs (all Beef)
  7. Berk’s Hot Dogs
  8. Carolina Packers Hot Dogs
  9. Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs
  10. Kessler Full Line Franks
  11. Old Wisconsin Sausage Franks
  12. Usinger Link Weiners
  13.  Klement’s Beef Sticks
  14. Johnsonville Beef Brats
  15. Sausage’s by Amy
  16. Hofmann’s Hot Dog’s
  17. Kowalski Hot Dog’s
  18. Kayhem Franks
  19. Kunzler Hot Dogs
  20. Omaha Steaks Hot Dogs
  21. Uncle Charlie Sausage
  22. John Morrell’s Beef Franks
  23. Eckrich Beef Franks
  24. Hebrew National Hot Dogs
  25. Miller’s Hot Dogs
  26. Coleman’s Natural Hot Dogs
  27. Zenner’s Sausage Company
  28. Bilinski’s all Beef Franks
  29. Koegel’s Frankfurters
  30. David Berg’s Hot Dogs
  31. Let’s be Frank
  32. Petit Jean Meats
  33. Dietz & Watson
  34. WindMill Hot Dogs
  35. Schaul’s Hot Dogs
  36. Niman’s Ranch Hot Dogs
  37. Weinershnitzel Hot Dogs
  38. Black Angus Beef Franks
  39. Farmer John Beef Franks
  40. Applegate Farms Organic Hot Dogs
  41. Fairgrounds Jumbo Beef Franks
  42. Abeles-Heyman Beef Franks
  43. International Glatt Kosher Hot & Spicy Beef Franks
  44. Sabrett Beef Hot Dogs
  45. Scott Petersen Hot Dogs
  46. Joe and Franks Beef Hot Dogs
  47. Red Hot Chicago Beef Franks
  48. Flunky’s Hot Dogs
  49. Bar S Beef Franks
  50. Boar’s Head Beef Frankfurter’s
  51. Daisy Brand Beef Wieners
  52. Kayem Fenway Franks Skinless
  53. BoBak’s Hot Dogs
  54. Safeway Select Beef Franks
  55. Jewel’s Beef Franks
  56. Wellshire Farms Hot Dogs
  57. Soy Boy Organic Hot Dogs
  58. Butterball Premium Turkey Franks
  59. Foster Farms Hot Dogs
  60. Hatfield Beef Franks
  61. Empire Kosher Chicken Franks
  62. Trader Joe’s All Natural Uncured all Beef Hot Dogs
  63. Light Life Tofu Hot Dogs 
  64. Yves Veggie Hot Dogs
  65. Tofurkey Hot Dogs
  66. Tony Packo’s Hot Dogs
  67. Loma Linda Vegatarain Hot Dogs
  68. Field Roast Grain Meat Farkfurters
  69. Morning Star Farms Vegan Corn Dogs
  70. Cedar Lake Franks
  71. Aidells Turkey Franks
  72. Casper’s Famous Hot Dogs
  73. DieStel Turkey Sausage
  74. Freybe Wieners
  75. Jennie O Turkey Franks
  76. Jones Dairy Farms
  77. Rocky Dogs Hot Dogs
  78. Thumann’s all Natural Pork and Beef Hot Dogs
  79. HoneySuckel White Brats
  80. Zacky Farms Turkey Franks
  81. Papa Cantella’s Hot Dogs
  82. Hoffy Brand Hot Dogs
  83. Cher-Make Hot Dogs
  84. Stahl-Meyer Frankfurters
  85. Best Provision Frankfurters
  86. Continetal Sausage
  87. Bryan Hot Dogs
  88. Sahlen’s Hot Dogs
  89. Organic Prarie Hot Dogs
  90. Wegman’s Hot Dogs
  91. Maverick Ranch Pure Beef Franks
  92. Farmer Johns Wieners
  93. Field Plump and Juicy
  94. Bar M Packers
  95. Lyke’s Hot Dogs
  96. Kahn’s Wieners
  97. Jordon’s Ball Game Treats Frank’s
  98. Jesse Jone Southern Style
  99. Gwaltney Great Big Dogs
  100. Zeigler’s Wieners
  101. Par-Ti Pups Wieners
  102. Earl Campbell Hot Links
  103. Branded Hot Links
  104. Grote and Weigle Natural Casing Frankfurters 
  105. Hoffman NC German Brand Franks
  106. Sugardale Wieners

 

Bubba Dogz Catering and PartiesTop 100 Hot Dog Manufacturers World Wide

 

Nathans Hot Dogs History

Nathans Famous History sign_over_new

Nathan’s Famous was founded by a Polish immigrant, Nathan Handwerker, and his is truly an authentic “only in America story.” He started his business in 1916 with a small hot dog stand in Coney Island, New York. He sold hot dogs that were manufactured based on a recipe developed by his wife, Ida.

In the over 96 years that have passed since opening day, Nathan’s has gained worldwide recognition for the unequaled quality and taste of its product. Today, Nathan’s has gained a reputation for being among the highest quality hot dogs in the world.

Nathan’s popularity was almost instantaneous, and in its earliest days had legendary characters such as Al Capone, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, and Cary Grant as regular customers. It gained its first international exposure when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt served Nathan’s Famous hot dogs to the King and Queen of England in 1939. Later, Roosevelt had Nathan’s hot dogs sent to Yalta when he met with Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Years later, Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York, stated that, “No man can hope to be elected in his state without being photographed eating a hot dog at Nathan’s Famous.”

Politicians, show-business personalities, and sports celebrities are often seen and photographed munching Nathan’s dogs, and heard singing its praises. Barbra Streisand, actually had Nathan’s hot dogs delivered to London, England for a private party. A trip to Nathan’s was the focus of a Seinfeld episode created by comedian Jerry Seinfeld. More recently, the ex-mayor of New York City Rudy Giuliani declared Nathan’s the “World’s best hot dog.” Shortly after that, Nathan Handwerker was named to the city’s top 100- joining the ranks of Joe Namath, Irving Berlin, Andrew Carnegie, Joe DiMaggio and others. Even Jacqueline Kennedy loved Nathan’s dogs, and served them at the White House. In his final last will and testament, actor Walter Mathau requested Nathan’s hot dogs to be served at his funeral – they were! The point is Nathan’s is not just a hot dog, it has history and it is Americana!hotdog_new

Last year there were over 435 million Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs sold! Today, Nathan’s is sold and enjoyed in all 50 States and sold at over 40,000 food service and retail outlets.

Dachsunds, Dog Wagons and Other Important Elements of Hot Dog History

Sausage is one of the oldest forms of processed food, having been mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey as far back as the 9th Century B.C.

Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, is traditionally credited with originating the frankfurter. However, this claim is disputed by those who assert that the popular sausage – known as a “dachshund” or “little-dog” sausage – was created in the late 1600’s by Johann Georghehner, a butcher, living in Coburg, Germany. According to this report, Georghehner later traveled to Frankfurt to promote his new product.

In 1987, the city of Frankfurt celebrated the 500th birthday of the hot dog in that city. It’s said that the frankfurter was developed there in 1487, five years before Christopher Columbus set sail for the new world. The people of Vienna (Wien), Austria, point to the term “wiener” to prove their claim as the birthplace of the hot dog.

As it turns out, it is likely that the North American hot dog comes from a widespread common European sausage brought here by butchers of several nationalities. Also in doubt is who first served the dachshund sausage with a roll. One report says a German immigrant sold them, along with milk rolls and sauerkraut, from a push cart in New York City’s Bowery during the 1860’s. In 1871, Charles Feltman, a German butcher opened up the first Coney Island hot dog stand selling 3,684 dachshund sausages in a milk roll during his first year in business.

The year, 1893, was an important date in hot dog history. In Chicago that year, the Colombian Exposition brought hordes of visitors who consumed large quantities of sausages sold by vendors. People liked this food that was easy to eat, convenient and inexpensive. Hot dog historian Bruce Kraig, Ph.D., retired professor emeritus at Roosevelt University, says the Germans always ate the dachshund sausages with bread. Since the sausage culture is German, it is likely that Germans introduced the practice of eating the dachshund sausages, which we today know as the hot dog, nestled in a bun.

Also in 1893, sausages became the standard fare at baseball parks. This tradition is believed to have been started by a St. Louis bar owner, Chris Von de Ahe, a German immigrant who also owned the St. Louis Browns major league baseball team.

Many hot dog historians chafe at the suggestion that today’s hot dog on a bun was introduced during the St. Louis “Louisiana Purchase Exposition” in 1904 by Bavarian concessionaire, Anton Feuchtwanger. As the story goes, he loaned white gloves to his patrons to hold his piping hot sausages and as most of the gloves were not returned, the supply began running low. He reportedly asked his brother-in-law, a baker, for help. The baker improvised long soft rolls that fit the meat – thus inventing the hot dog bun. Kraig says everyone wants to claim the hot dog bun as their own invention, but the most likely scenario is the practice was handed down by German immigrants and gradually became widespread in American culture.

Another story that riles serious hot dog historians is how term “hot dog” came about. Some say the word was coined in 1901 at the New York Polo Grounds on a cold April day. Vendors were hawking hot dogs from portable hot water tanks shouting “They’re red hot! Get your dachshund sausages while they’re red hot!” A New York Journal sports cartoonist, Tad Dorgan, observed the scene and hastily drew a cartoon of barking dachshund sausages nestled warmly in rolls. Not sure how to spell “dachshund” he simply wrote “hot dog!” The cartoon is said to have been a sensation, thus coining the term “hot dog.” However, historians have been unable to find this cartoon, despite Dorgan’s enormous body of work and his popularity.

Kraig, and other culinary historians, point to college magazines where the word “hot dog” began appearing in the 1890s. The term was current at Yale in the fall of 1894,when “dog wagons” sold hot dogs at the dorms. The name was a sarcastic comment on the provenance of the meat. References to dachshund sausages and ultimately hot dogs can be traced to German immigrants in the 1800s. These immigrants brought not only sausages to America, but dachshund dogs. The name most likely began as a joke about the Germans’ small, long, thin dogs. In fact, even Germans called the frankfurter a “little-dog” or “dachshund” sausage, thus linking the word “dog” to their popular concoction.

Top 100 Hot Dog Manufacturers World Wide

 

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hot dog is a cooked sausage, traditionally grilled or steamed and served in a sliced bun as a sandwich.[2][3][4][5] Hot dog variantsinclude the corn dog dipped in corn batter and deep fried, pigs in blankets wrapped in dough, baked, and served as hors d’oeuvres, and Beanie Weenies chopped and mixed with baked beans. Typical hot dog garnishes include mustardketchuponions,mayonnaiserelishcheesechili, and sauerkraut.

The sausages were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where they were a working class street food sold at hot dog stands that came to be associated with baseball and America. Hot dog preparation and condiment styles also vary regionally across the United States. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest andWienermobile.

History

Hot dogs cooked, served, and eaten at Coney Island in 1940

Claims about hot dog invention are difficult to assess, as stories assert the creation of the sausage, the placing of the sausage (or another kind of sausage) on bread or a bun as finger food, the popularization of the existing dish, or the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word frankfurter comes from FrankfurtGermany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated.[6] These sausages,Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. Wiener refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef[7] (cf. Hamburger, whose name also derives from a German-speaking city). Johann Georg Lahner, a 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter.[8] Nowadays, in German speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Around 1870, on Coney IslandGerman immigrant Charles Feltman began selling sausages in rolls.[9][10][11]

Carts selling frankfurters in New York City, circa 1906. The price is listed as “3 cents each or 2 for 5 cents”.

Others have supposedly invented the hot dog. The idea of a hot dog on a bun is ascribed to the wife of a German named Antonoine Feuchtwanger, who sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, MissouriUnited States, in 1880, because his customers kept taking the white gloves handed to them for eating without burning their hands.[12] Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger, a Bavarian sausage seller, is said to have served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair–either the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago or the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St Louis[13]–again allegedly because the white gloves he gave to customers so that they could eat his hot sausages in comfort began to disappear as souvenirs.[14]

The association between hot dogs and baseball began as early as 1893 with Chris von der Ahe, a German immigrant who owned not only the St. Louis Browns, but also an amusement park.[15]

Another claim of inventing the hot dog is told by Harry M. Stevens, an American sports concessionaire whose vendors sold German sausages and rolls to spectators at the old New York Polo Grounds during the winter. He called them “Dachshund sandwiches”, but a New York Post cartoonist “couldn’t spell dachshund, so when he drew the cartoon, he called them hot dogs.”[16]

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer.[17] Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.[17]

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.[14]

Etymology

Dog Factory (1904), a short film that joked with contemporary dual connotations for the word “dog”

The term dog has been used as a synonym for sausage since 1884 and accusations that sausage makers used dog meat date to at least 1845.[18] In the early 20th century, consumption of dog meat in Germany was common.[19][20] The suspicion that sausages contained dog meat was “occasionally justified”.[21]

According to a myth, the use of the complete phrase hot dog in reference to sausage was coined by the newspaper cartoonist Thomas Aloysius “TAD” Dorgan around 1900 in a cartoon recording the sale of hot dogs during a New York Giants baseball game at the Polo Grounds.[18] However, TAD’s earliest usage of hot dog was not in reference to a baseball game at the Polo Grounds, but to a bicycle race at Madison Square Garden, in The New York Evening Journal December 12, 1906, by which time the term hot dog in reference to sausage was already in use.[18][22] In addition, no copy of the apocryphal cartoon has ever been found.[23]

The earliest known usage of hot dog in clear reference to sausage, found by Fred R. Shapiro, appeared in the December 31, 1892 issue of the Paterson (New Jersey) Daily Press.[24] The story concerned a local traveling vendor, Thomas Francis Xavier Morris, also known as “Hot Dog Morris”.[25]

Somehow or other a frankfurter and a roll seem to go right to the spot where the void is felt the most. The small boy has got on such familiar terms with this sort of lunch that he now refers to it as “hot dog.” “Hey, Mister, give me a hot dog quick,” was the startling order that a rosy-cheeked gamin hurled at the man as a Press reporter stood close by last night. The “hot dog” was quickly inserted in a gash in a roll, a dash of mustard also splashed on to the “dog” with a piece of flat whittled stick, and the order was fulfilled.

Other early uses of hot dog in reference to sausage appeared in the New Brunswick (New Jersey) Daily Times (May 20, 1893), the New York World (May 26, 1893), and theKnoxville (Tennessee) Journal (September 28, 1893).[22]

General description

Grilled hot dogs

Ingredients

Common hot dog ingredients include:[26]

Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low costmechanically separated poultry. Hot dogs often have high sodium, fat and nitrite content, ingredients linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

If a manufacturer produces two types of hot dogs, “wieners” tend to contain pork and are blander, while “franks” tend to be all beef and more strongly seasoned.[citation needed]

Commercial preparation

The making of a Hormel hot dog (1964)

Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.

Natural casing hot dogs

As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters.[27] These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.[27]

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstitutedcollagen casings.[27]

Skinless hot dogs

“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925[28] by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.[29]

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax“, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home cooking hot dogs

Hot dogs are prepared and eaten in a variety of ways. The wieners may be boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, or microwaved.[30] The cooked wiener may be served on a bun (usually topped with condiments), or it may be used as an ingredient in another dish.

Health effects

United States Department of Agriculture 1964 film on hot dog and other meat inspection

Unlike other sausages which may be sold uncooked, hot dogs are cooked before packaging. Hot dogs can be eaten without additional cooking, although they are usually warmed before serving. Because an unopened, packaged hot dog can have Listeria bacteria that causelisteriosis, it is safer to heat them, especially for pregnant women and those with suppressed immune systems.[31]

An American Institute for Cancer Research report found that consuming one 50-gram serving of processed meat — about one hot dog — every day increases risk of colorectal cancer by 20 percent.[32][33] The Cancer Project group filed a class-action lawsuit demanding warning labels on packages and at sporting events.[34] Hot dogs are high in fat and salt and have preservatives sodium nitrate and nitrite, which are possible contributors to nitrate-containing chemicals believed to cause cancer.[35] According to the AICR, the average risk of colorectal cancer is 5.8 percent, but 7 percent when a hot dog is consumed daily over years.[35]

Hot dogs have relatively low heterocyclic amines (HCA) levels compared to other types of ready-to-eat meat products, because they are manufactured at low temperatures.[36]

Choking risk

Hot dogs present a significant choking risk, especially for children. A study in the US found that 17% of food-related asphyxiations among children younger than 10 years of age were caused by hot dogs.[37] Their size, shape and texture make them difficult to expel from the windpipe. This risk can be reduced by cutting a hot dog into small pieces or lengthwise strips before serving to young children. It is suggested that redesign of size, shape and texture would reduce the risk.[38] One pediatric emergency doctor comments that a stuck hot dog is “almost impossible” to dislodge from a child’s windpipe.[38]

In the United States

A “home-cooked” hot dog with ketchup, mustard, raw onion, fried onion, artificial bacon bits, and pickle relish

In the US, “hot dog” may refer to just the sausage or to the combination of a sausage in a bun. Many nicknames for hot dogs have popped up over the years. A hot dog can often be seen under the names of frankfurter, frank, red hot, wiener, weenie, durger, coney, or just “dog”.

Hot dog restaurants

Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually.[39] Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.

Condiments

Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

For a list of regional differences in hot dog preparation and condiments, see Hot dog variations.

Hot dogs may be served plain, but are commonly served with a variety of condiments, including ketchup, mustard, chile con carne, pickle relish, sauerkraut, onion, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular condiment, with 32% of respondents preferring it; 23% of Americans said they preferred ketchup; chili con carne came in third at 17%, followed by relish at 9% and onions at 7%. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.[40]

Condiments vary across the country. All-beef Chicago-style hot dogs are topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, sport peppers, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt, but they exclude ketchup.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Italian hot dogs popular in New Jersey include peppers, onions, and potatoes. MeatyMichigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. In New York City, conventional hot dogs are available on Coney Island, as are bagel dogsHot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.”[41] Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston and Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The Fenway signature is that the hot dog is boiled and grilled Fenway-style, and then served on a New England-style bun, covered with ketchup and relish. Often during Red Sox games, vendors traverse the stadium selling the hot dogs plain, giving customers the choice of adding the condiments.[citation needed]

Hot dogs outside North America

For a list of international differences in hot dogs, see Hot dog variations.

In most of the world, “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand, it refers to a battered sausage, often on a stick (which is known as a corn dog in North America), and the version in a bun is called an “American hot dog”.

 

  • A common brand of hot dog available throughout China

  • Thai khanom Tokiao being prepared, a Thai style crêpe with a hot dog sausage, at a night market

 

Records

The world’s longest hot dog, at 60 meters

The world’s longest hot dog created was 60 meters (197 ft), which rested within a 60.3-meter (198 ft) bun. The hot dog was prepared by Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.

A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for US$69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.[42]

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The “California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18″ all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic & herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic viniagrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb. super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.[43]

See also